Pre dating tips

Posted by / 02-Jul-2017 02:32

Although restored, it appears near choice and displays well on the custom metal display stand (included). A fine example and a rare type that is substantial in size. In good condition with one claw partially restored and another reattached. The vessel sits on a low base and is topped by an arching stirrup handle with slightly flared spout, indicative of Phase III. 5 — Peru 900 BC - 200 BC A large Chavin bottle (vessel) from the northern highlands of ancient Peru, dating to the Formative Period. The blades flare at the end to crescent shape and a sharp edge. Two human figures with arms held upward and wearing crescent shaped 'solar' headdresses along with two monkeys (or felines) shown in profile also wearing solar headdresses. At the base of the handle are two ball-shaped objects (appearing as testicles) which form the whistles. A crack in the main body has been stabilized and restored. Minor scrapes and dings present along with deposits and some fire clouding. The remainder was later sold through various art auctions in NYC. A flared bowl sits atop three large jaguar heads, each containing their original rattle balls. The figure is of hollow construction with red, tan and black painted and burnished surface. 0 — Peru 400 AD - 600 AD A large and impressive Moche Phase IV portrait vessel from the Northern Coastal region of ancient Peru. 50 — Costa Rica - Panama 1100 AD - 1450 AD An unusual pottery vessel in the form of an armadillo. 5 — Peru 1000 AD - 1400 AD A Chancay painted bowl from ancient Peru. Outside of the obvious losses, they are intact with nice deposits. The face and hands are painted in yellow-gold pigment, otherwise covered in a cream-tan slip with deposits and some root marks present. Assembled from original pieces (as is common) with break lines restored and minor losses replaced. In the other hand is a five-lobed ceremonial rattle. 0 — Peru 700 AD - 1000 AD A rare Wari aryballo (water transport vessel) from ancient Peru. The vessel is rounded with a flat bottom and has a flared spout. Rounded bottom with corseted sides; an elegant form. He (she) smiles widely exposing filed teeth and has almond shaped eyes. It depicts a central band of stylized birds with rows of waves (water motif) at the top and bottom. The gently curving sides of the bowl are finely painted in diagonal stripes. The back is completely painted with parallel lines in black on tan. Assembled from approximately six original pieces with breaklines partially restored and slightly visible. The cream colored surface is nicely burnished inside and out with areas of orange and black (fire clouding) on one side. Assembled from three original pieces with breaks restored. Minor surface wear, dings and scratches along with light deposits consistent with age. The surface shows considerable root marks and moderate to heavy deposits. An entity that represents the underworld sun or 'The Sun of the Region of the Dead'. 00 — Costa Rica Two Costa Rican tripod vessels from the Diquis region, circa 300 AD - 700 AD. The legs are decorated with stylized zoomorphic figures. Buff terracotta construction with orange and tan paint. Acquired from an estate collection, an old inventory number (3465) is written in ink on the back of one foot. The head and both arms have been reattached with breaklines restored and the open hand has been replaced, otherwise intact and original. There is stippling overall with a smooth vertical band deeply incised with abstract geometric patterns. Rectangular shape with rounded corners and still retains a nice reflective surface. A piece of one corner appears to have been reattached, but it is all original with some scrapes, minor edge chipping and light wear from age and usage as would be expected. Despite having considerable repairs and restoration, it displays well on the custom metal stand which is included as shown. Achira is a tuber-type plant that is high in starch. The stomach protrudes slightly, possibly indicating pregnancy. Faint traces of other colors remaining in some areas. Carved from green speckled stone with earthen deposits. The headdress is two alligator heads facing outward. Restoration to the corner of the head and one foot. The exterior is nicely incised with complex geometric patterns. It has pierced tapered tripod legs, each containing numerous small rattle balls.

Each leg has an open slit that contains a rattle ball. 5 — Peru 1100 AD - 1350 AD A fine Chimu blackware vessel in the form of a fruit or possibly a gourd. Being unpainted it is difficult to attribute, but most likely from Southern Guatemala or El Salvador.

Blackware construction with an ovoid (canteen-like) form, topped by a straight spout and wide looped strap handle.

8" across x 3.25" tall 5 — Peru 900 AD - 1350 AD A large Chimu bottle showing strong Lambayeque-Sican influence.

The figure's head has been reattached and one arm has been replaced, otherwise intact. The face is nicely detailed with typical coffee-bean style eyes and slit mouth. Both legs have been reattached along breaks at the upper thighs, otherwise intact and complete. Bowl #1 (Top), Large, shallow bowl with small nubbin tripod feet, widely flared sides and decorated with incised scalloped (cloud) designs. Buff terracotta construction with some white stucco remaining in the deep crevices and light earthen deposits overall. Similar examples can be seen in the book "Hidden Faces of the Maya" by Linda Schele. Known as the "Disjunctive Style" in which the complex designs of the earlier periods were vastly condensed and abbreviated to simple lines, circles, waves and chevrons. Approx 7" tall x 6" across 5 — Guatemala 300 AD - 600 AD Large Maya creamware vessel from the Southern Lowlands of Guatemala, dating to the Early Classic Peord. The dome retained the heat within and allowed the incense offering to smolder and emit smoke from beneath the bottom edge. Spout reattached with restored break - 3) Tripod vessel (right) - Approx. Lovely bowl with solid (rare, human-form) legs and in perfect condition - 0 Priced individually or 0 for all three — Mexico 1000 AD - 1500 AD Post Classic period Mixtec tripod bowl. All are well made, thin walled examples of "bisque ware" pottery, typical of that region. Also included is a six-inch long, bone weaver's wand topped by an incised human face. One is over ten inches long and still retains its original thread. Both spindles have nicely decorated terracotta whorls.

The whistle works perfectly and has a nice, clear tone. A few scrapes and dings along with surface deposits, but generally a fine example that displays well on the custom metal stand which is included. 8.5" across x 3" tall - 0 Bowl #2 (Center), Large bowl with flared rim and carved, fluted (ribs) pattern all around the exterior. This example shows scalloped lines and dots on the upper portion and a wide band of black below. Shallow bowl with a fish motif; head at one end and tail at the other with long 'fins' down both sides. The figure likely represents a deceased ancestor for whom the incense offerings were made to honor. Completely intact with no cracks, breaks or repairs. Elegant form with integrated loop handles and in perfect condition - 0 2) Simple olla (left) - Approx. This type is referred to as a grating dish or "molcajete". Two rim shards have been reattached and the breaks restored. All are mounted and framed under glass in a black (high-quality) shadowbox display.

pre dating tips-35pre dating tips-78pre dating tips-65

— Costa Rica - Panama 1000 AD - 1500 AD A large two-handled olla from the border area of Costa Rica and Panama - Diquis Zone, dating to the Chirique Phase, Period VI. The surface is highly burnished and polychrome painted in natural tones of cream, red, purple, orange, brown and black. The top of the vessel is nicely decorated (a rare feature) with carved vertical lines and triangular patterns filled with pierced dots. Assembled from four large pieces and a dozen or more smaller shards with breaks restored inside and out. Despite considerable restoration, it appears intact and displays beautifully on a custom metal ring stand that is included. A rare example from a time just prior to the collapse of the Maya civilization. The vessel sits on a slightly rounded bottom and is topped by an arching stirrup handle with slightly flared spout, indicative of Phase III. A small area of damage to the spout has been restored, otherwise it is intact and original. At the back is a third tripod (support) leg and above that is the mouthpiece for an internal whistle. Beautifully decorated with a wide band of incised angular designs around most of the outer rim. The cheeks have additional incising that indicate facial tattooing or ritual scarification in the woven mat motif suggesting this individual was of the elite ruling class. 15 original pieces with restored break lines and small losses replaced. A large area of fire-clouding and surface discoloration on one side and the bottom. An exceptional example that is masterfully crafted. Prominently featured at the top is a band of stylized jaguars and plumed serpents. These being rendered upside-down is symbolically important and is thought to imply that the bottom register is depicting a scene from the Underworld; an inversion of the earthly realm above and symbolically suggests a sense of duality. The raised ring, just above the base has been partially restored, otherwise completely intact and original with no chips, cracks or breaks. At his side is a (conjoined) standing llama with elongated body. Almost certainly he is a shaman or a person of great importance. — West Mexico 100 BC - 250 AD A nice pair of Jalisco female figures. An elegant shape with a flared pedestal base and a sharply angled bowl. The upper shoulder of the bowl is decorated with finely incised linear and stippled geometric patterns. A relatively unknown culture, their pottery is exceptionally well crafted and beautifully painted in colors and styles very similar to the neighboring Tiwanaku, but their wares are typically more refined in their execution. Antara 1 is — Costa Rica - Panama 1000 AD - 1500 AD An adorable terracotta deer effigy vessel from the border area of Costa Rica and Panama - Diquis Zone, dating to the Chirique Phase, Period VI. Hollow construction with a domed front showing an avian motif. The dog is realistically sculpted, nicely detailed and sits atop a box-shaped (cube) lower chamber. — West Mexico 100 BC - 250 AD A medium-large redware phytomorphic vessel from the Colima region of ancient West Mexico. Sometimes referred to as corn-poppers based on their form, they were actually used as ceremonial water dippers by the ancient Moche. $650 — Peru 400 AD - 700 AD A nice Moche pottery trumpet from ancient Peru, dating to Phase IV. The long, hollow tubular body is curved (looped) at the top, ending with the mouth-piece. Bi-chrome painted in red and cream with three sets of chevrons radiating outward from the center along with pairs of wavy lines. Displays well on the custom metal stand which is included as shown. The sides are nearly vertical and flare slightly at the rim. $2400 — Costa Rica - Panama 1000 AD - 1500 AD An adorable bird vessel from the border area of Costa Rica and Panama (Diquis Zone) dating to the Chirique Phase, Period VI. It depicts a seated figure with hands resting on the knees, polychrome painted with linear designs in shades of red and brown against a cream ground. $250 — Ecuador 300 BC - 300 AD An unusual avian motif pottery rattle sculpture from the Manabi Province of ancient Ecuador. Some light surface wear, scrapes and minor imperfections as would be expected. See Klein and Cevallos "Ecuador - The Secret Art of Pre Columbian Ecuador" for additional scholarly information on ancient Manteno art and culture. A very diverse grouping with examples ranging from the early cultures of Mexico, down through Central America to later cultures of Peru. Flat bottom with rounded body and tapered neck topped by a large inverted rim with incised decoration and a scalloped edge. In good condition with some rim restoration and the tip of the handle restored, otherwise intact. There is a similar example of this type on display at the Davis Museum and Cultural Center of Wellesley College in Massachusetts. The highly burnished orange-red surface shows calcified deposits and mineralization, heavy in some areas. This example is constructed of buff terracotta and is in very good condition. The lightly burnished gray surface has a large area of (almost black) fire-clouding. For comparable examples of this exact type, as well as additional scholarly information, see "Sculpture of Ancient West Mexico", by Kan, Meighan & Nicholson, page 141. Minor restoration to a very small part the figure's right eye and eyebrow, otherwise intact and original. The central design element is a wide band of highly stylized stingrays. The exterior of the vessel has some light paint enhancements and there is a shallow one inch pock-mark in the bottom, but it is completely intact with no breaks or cracks. Two of them still have scattered remains of yellow pigment in the crevices. One has a few minor chips and another shows light erosion on one side, but overall they are intact and are fine examples. The figure is nicely adorned with ear spools and a wide pointed collar, likely representing feathers. The figure has been reattached at the legs and the break restored. See page 209, plate 122 of Klein and Cevallos "Ecuador - The Secret Art of Pre Columbian Ecuador" for a comparable example and additional scholarly information. 9" tall x 6" across $1500 — Ecuador 500 BC - 500 AD A choice Jamacoaque pottery vessel featuring a matched pair of conjoined bowls. He is shown wearing a complex headdress with two-pronged horn on top, long side flaps down the back and cone-shaped nodes on the frontal ridge. — Peru 900 BC - 500 BC Early stone items from the Chavin culture of Northern Peru. Unlike the more common "pretty lady" type, the form is more stylized. These wooden barbed points would have been lashed to longer shafts and were most likely used for fishing in the rivers and coastal waters. A type that later evolved into the more realistic and refined 'pumpkin' vessels. Above that, deeply corseted sides are carved with a stylized woven "mat" pattern. Black painted decoration on the headdress and body. The figure contains numerous rattle balls and a whistle in the base. A fine and rare example with excellent published provenance. Approx 9" tall x 6.5" across $7500 — West Mexico 300 BC- 200 AD A nice terracotta bowl from Jalisco, West Mexico. The lightly burnished surface is a creamy yellow-orange with a red stripe just below the rim. 7" across x 5" tall $250 — Mexico 500 BC - 100 BC A lovely Chupicuaro brownware pottery bowl.